Find a Clinical Trial

View a list of clinical trials that Central Vermont Medical Center's cancer program currently participates in.

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For more information please call the CVMC Clinical Trial Office.

 802-225-5419

Central Vermont Medical Center participates in clinical trials as an affiliate of the University of Vermont Cancer Center. Clinical trials connect patients with cutting-edge treatment options while also participating in the process to look for better ways to prevent, diagnose, or treat cancer. Many of the “standard treatments” that patients receive today were developed based on the results of previous clinical trials.

Every clinical trial has specific safety criteria that define which patients can participate in the trial. Your doctor, nurses and staff make up the clinical research team that collaboratively focus on offering the very best care for you and your family. Consider joining a clinical trial today, you could help change the future of medicine.

Find a Clinical Trial

Brain Cancer Clinical Trials

Brain: Treatment Trials

A071701 – Genetic Testing in Guiding Treatment for Patients With Brain Metastases
This phase II trial studies how well genetic testing works in guiding treatment for patients with solid tumors that have spread to the brain. Several genes have been found to be altered or mutated in brain metastases such as NTRK, ROS1, CDK or PI3K. Medications that target these genes such as abemaciclib, GDC-0084, and entrectinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Genetic testing may help doctors tailor treatment for each mutation.
Breast Cancer Clinical Trials

Breast: Treatment Trials

A011202 – Comparison of Axillary Lymph Node Dissection with Axillary Radiation for Patients with Node-Positive Breast Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy
This randomized phase III trial studies lymph node dissection and radiation therapy to see how well it works compared to radiation therapy alone in treating patients with breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy and surgery. Lymph node dissection may remove cancer cells that have spread to nearby lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays or protons to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known if radiation therapy works better alone or with lymph node dissection in treating patients with breast cancer previously treated with chemotherapy and surgery.
NRG-BR003 – Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Paclitaxel With or Without Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer
This randomized phase III trial studies how well doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel with or without carboplatin work in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide is more effective when followed by paclitaxel alone or paclitaxel and carboplatin in treating triple-negative breast cancer.
Colorectal Cancer Clinical Trials

Colorectal: Treatment Trials

EA2182 – Lower-Dose Chemoradiation in Treating Patients with Early-Stage Anal Cancer, the DECREASE Study
This phase II trial studies how well lower-dose chemotherapy plus radiation (chemoradiation) therapy works in comparison to standard-dose chemoradiation in treating patients with early-stage anal cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin, fluorouracil, and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. This study may help doctors find out if lower-dose chemoradiation is as effective and has fewer side effects than standard-dose chemoradiation, which is the usual approach for treatment of this cancer type.
A021703 – Vitamin D3 with Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer
This phase III trial studies how well vitamin D3 given with standard chemotherapy and bevacizumab works in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Vitamin D3 helps the body use calcium and phosphorus to make strong bones and teeth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving vitamin D3 with chemotherapy and bevacizumab may work better in shrinking or stabilizing colorectal cancer. It is not yet known whether giving high-dose vitamin D3 in addition to chemotherapy and bevacizumab would extend patients' time without disease compared to the usual approach (chemotherapy and bevacizumab).

Colorectal: Symptom Management & Quality of Life

A221805 – Duloxetine to Prevent Oxaliplatin-Induced Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase II to Phase III Study
This phase II/III trial studies the best dose of duloxetine and how well it works in preventing pain, tingling, and numbness (peripheral neuropathy) caused by treatment with oxaliplatin in patients with stage II-III colorectal cancer. Duloxetine increases the amount of certain chemicals in the brain that help relieve depression and pain. Giving duloxetine in patients undergoing treatment with oxaliplatin for colorectal cancer may help prevent peripheral neuropathy.
Esophageal Cancer Clinical Trials

Esophageal: Treatment Trials

EA2174 – A Phase II/III Study of Peri-operative Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Patients with Locoregional Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma
This phase II/III trial studies the usefulness of treatment with nivolumab and ipilimumab in addition to standard of care chemotherapy and radiation therapy in patients with esophageal and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma who are undergoing surgery. Immunotherapy with antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may remove the brake on the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy may reduce the tumor size and the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed during surgery. A combined treatment with nivolumab and ipilimumab, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy might be more effective in patients with esophageal and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma who are undergoing surgery.
Kidney Cancer Clinical Trials

Kidney: Treatment Trials

A031704 – Immunotherapy with Nivolumab and Ipilimumab Followed by Nivolumab or Nivolumab with Cabozantinib for Patients with Advanced Kidney Cancer, The PDIGREE Study
This phase III trial compares the usual treatment (treatment with ipilimumab and nivolumab followed by nivolumab alone) to treatment with ipilimumab and nivolumab, followed by nivolumab with cabozantinib in patients with untreated renal cell carcinoma that has spread to other parts of the body. The addition of cabozantinib to the usual treatment may make it work better. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cabozantinib, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known how well the combination of cabozantinib and nivolumab after initial treatment with ipilimumab and nivolumab works in treating patients with renal cell cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.
Lung Cancer Clinical Trials

Lung: Treatment Trials

E4512 – Crizotinib in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Has Been Removed by Surgery and ALK Fusion Mutations (An ALCHEMIST Treatment Trial)
This randomized phase III trial studies how well crizotinib works in treating patients with stage IB-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer that has been removed by surgery and has a mutation in a protein called anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Mutations, or changes, in ALK can make it very active and important for tumor cell growth and progression. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking the ALK protein from working. Crizotinib may be an effective treatment for patients with non-small cell lung cancer and an ALK fusion mutation
EA5163 – Firstline Pembrolizumab Alone or in Combination With Pemetrexed and Carboplatin in Induction/Maintenance or Postprogression in Treating Patients With Stage IV Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer
This phase III trial studies whether pembrolizumab alone as a first-line treatment, followed by pemetrexed and carboplatin with or without pembrolizumab after disease progression is superior to induction with pembrolizumab, pemetrexed and carboplatin followed by pembrolizumab and pemetrexed maintenance in treating patients with stage IV non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pemetrexed and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving first-line pembrolizumab followed by pemetrexed and carboplatin with or without pembrolizumab works better in treating patients with non-squamous non-small cell cancer.
LUNGMAP – Lung-MAP: A Master Screening Protocol for Previously-Treated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
This screening and multi-sub-study randomized phase II/III trial will establish a method for genomic screening of similar large cancer populations followed by assigning and accruing simultaneously to a multi-sub-study hybrid Master Protocol (Lung-MAP). The type of cancer trait (biomarker) will determine to which sub-study, within this protocol, a participant will be assigned to compare new targeted cancer therapy, designed to block the growth and spread of cancer, or combinations to standard of care therapy with the ultimate goal of being able to approve new targeted therapies in this setting. In addition, the protocol includes non-match sub-studies which will include all screened patients not eligible for any of the biomarker-driven sub-studies.
A151216 – Genetic Testing in Screening PGenetic Testing in Screening Patients With Stage IB-IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Has Beenatients With Stage IB-IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Has Been or Will Be Removed by Surgery (The ALCHEMIST Screening Trial
This phase III ALCHEMIST trial studies genetic testing in screening patients with stage IB-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer that has been or will be removed by surgery. Studying the genes in a patient's tumor cells may help doctors select the best treatment for patients that have certain genetic changes.
NRG-LU005 – Chemoradiation With or Without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer
This phase II/III trial studies how well chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation) with or without atezolizumab works in treating patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, cisplatin, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving chemoradiation with or without atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer.
Lymphoma Clinical Trials

Lymphoma: Treatment Trials

EA4151 – Rituximab With or Without Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Minimal Residual Disease-Negative Mantle Cell Lymphoma in First Complete Remission
This randomized phase III trial studies rituximab after stem cell transplant and to see how well it works compared with rituximab alone in treating patients with in minimal residual disease-negative mantle cell lymphoma in first complete remission. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Giving rituximab with or without stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma.
Melanoma Clinical Trials

Melanoma: Treatment Trials

S1801 – A Study to Compare the Administration of Pembrolizumab After Surgery vs Administration Both Before and After Surgery for High-Risk Melanoma
This phase II trial studies how pembrolizumab works before and after surgery in treating patients with stage III-IV high-risk melanoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.. Giving pembrolizumab before and after surgery may work better compared to after surgery alone in treating melanoma.
Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials

Prostate: Treatment Trials

NRG-GU005 – Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy or Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIA-B Prostate Cancer
This randomized phase III trial studies how well stereotactic body radiation therapy works compared to intensity-modulated radiation therapy in treating patients with stage IIA-B prostate cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a specialized radiation therapy that sends x-rays directly to the tumor using smaller doses over several days and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Stereotactic body radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
S1802 – Standard Systemic Therapy With or Without Definitive Treatment in Treating Participants with Metastatic Prostate Cancer
This phase III trial studies how well standard systemic therapy with or without definitive treatment (prostate removal surgery or radiation therapy) works in treating participants with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Addition of prostate removal surgery or radiation therapy to standard systemic therapy for prostate cancer may lower the chance of the cancer growing or spreading.